Fight breast cancer and carry a big stick…

The closest I’ve come to breast cancer is Connie. I’m fighting for her with my strongest weapon, prayer, and by carrying a big stick — more specifically, “Connie on a stick” (featured in the photo with Connie). Please pray for Connie. Today my friend and faithful workout partner undergoes surgery, fighting breast cancer one medical procedure at a time.

I don’t care if this blog post goes viral, but I sure wish your prayers, good thoughts, fingers crossed or whatever on Connie’s behalf do. Pray for Connie. Spread the word, please.

Less than a month ago, 67-year-old Connie was plotting how she could work long enough to support herself at least until age 100. (Her mother is that age and still counting birthdays.) Less than a month ago, a mammogram was a yearly obligation and a reason for a shorter workout and no deodorant the day of the appointment. Until Connie got the call back for more screens and a knowledgeable “it doesn’t look benign” from her doctor. Then the 3D mammogram became her blessing. Along with her astute radiology team and doctor and the swift biopsy and her team of oncologists and specialists and today’s scheduled surgery. Her tumor, too small to feel by touch but revealed by the mammogram, is an invasive type of breast cancer, and Connie is getting rid of it today.

If all goes well, Connie will have a lumpectomy, a high-tech “squid” inserted in her breast to direct radiation therapy exactly where it is needed, and her third of five days of twice-daily radiation on Christmas Eve. Chemo will follow radiation.

I could barely leave the health club in a timely fashion this morning because so many people wanted to know about Connie and, more specifically, what they could do to help. They wanted the details about her cancer, her treatment, her caregivers, etc. One of the more medical types asked:

“Who is going to take care of Connie when she’s going through chemotherapy and getting sick?”

“Connie isn’t planning on getting sick,” I replied, simply.

The women smiled, nodded, and said they expected Connie was feisty enough to fight this, too.

Connie is still planning on living to 100 and beyond — and, quite frankly, I want my workout partner back for another 33 years or so.

I have to keep this short because I want to post this before work so you can start your prayers on Connie’s behalf. I believe prayer is the first weapon we can all wield. The second one I am carrying is “Connie on a stick” (pictured above). Weird, silly, I know. But the back story is this: Connie is the office manager at a small company, and years ago one of her coworkers shot a photo of her, then blew it up to life size and mounted it on a stick, along with her typical sayings meant to keep everyone in line. When Connie would leave for vacation, she would return to find “Connie on a stick” (in various modes of dress) sitting in her chair, keeping the office running as it should.

Yesterday, she brought me “Connie on a stick,” and I’ll be sure to make her alter ego go through our daily workouts in Connie’s absence. It’s one way to let my dear friend know she is missed.

Prayers, please! The hospital is sending me emails. Connie’s in pre-op now. (She has given me permission to blog about her. I did ask!) I’ll keep you posted. Please pray for the best possible outcome, as well as peace and comfort for Connie throughout. Thank you in advance!

9 thoughts on “Fight breast cancer and carry a big stick…

  1. I will be praying for Connie! I too, went through a lumpectomy and radiation 15 years ago. Only the mammogram showed the spot that was turning into cancer! I was able to continue working throughout all the treatments! No chemo. They do things differently todayπŸ˜€, love and prayers are going her way! God bless you for your love for her!! πŸ˜πŸ’•β€οΈπŸ˜

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Absolutely! She is planning on returning Monday (today), though she won’t be back in full capacity for a couple of weeks at least. I’ll be happy to see her, too. πŸ™‚

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